cover

16,387,414 Photos and Videos

4 seconds ago

Time for the Fan Feature Diana here cheers on Her PATS but it’s a Sad Day when the Gronk Retires gronk dianalnoris Shoutout to A Special Sporty Girl she is his 1 Fan . Ohh snap look who was The First To Like His Instagram Retirement Post . The Fans Plain Rock Thank You for the 15K Love ❤️ Live ❤️ Laugh You’re All Amazing Our SUCCESS depends on YOU LIKE and SHARE the FB page . https:www.sportygirlnailskins.com la gronknation love gronk actress nailsofinstagram bostonbabes bostonnails ny starbucks lit dallas cover ny rebelgal bostonfoodie nailart boston natural patriots friends inspirationalquotes rebel nepatriots beauty life gronkowski

00
54 seconds ago

Time for the Fan Feature Diana here cheers on Her PATS but it’s a Sad Day when the Gronk Retires gronk dianalnoris Shoutout to A Special Sporty Girl she is his 1 Fan . Ohh snap look who was The First To Like His Instagram Retirement Post . The Fans Plain Rock Thank You for the 15K Love ❤️ Live ❤️ Laugh You’re All Amazing Our SUCCESS depends on YOU LIKE and SHARE the FB page . https:www.sportygirlnailskins.com la gronknation love gronk actress nailsofinstagram bostonbabes bostonnails ny starbucks lit dallas cover ny rebelgal bostonfoodie nailart boston natural patriots friends inspirationalquotes rebel nepatriots beauty life gronkowski

40
56 seconds ago

Cover of “Baby” by Bishop Briggs. It occurred to me after making this video that the lyrics are not very appropriate for a toddler audience 😆, but hey it’s a beautiful song and melody AND shows a real ass moment from our lives. Performing tonight at the Axe and Oak 7-10. juannah_official juanito_loops bishopbriggs cover toddlerlife

10
1 minute ago

Time for the Fan Feature Diana here cheers on Her PATS but it’s a Sad Day when the Gronk Retires gronk dianalnoris Shoutout to A Special Sporty Girl she is his 1 Fan . Ohh snap look who was The First To Like His Instagram Retirement Post . The Fans Plain Rock Thank You for the 15K Love ❤️ Live ❤️ Laugh You’re All Amazing Our SUCCESS depends on YOU LIKE and SHARE the FB page . https:www.sportygirlnailskins.com la gronknation love gronk actress nailsofinstagram bostonbabes bostonnails ny starbucks lit dallas cover ny rebelgal bostonfoodie nailart boston natural patriots friends inspirationalquotes rebel nepatriots beauty life gronkowski

70
3 minutes ago

Wow what a SONG. Enjoy this cover of lewiscapaldi ‘s someoneyouloved bc it makes me weep! FT. My nostrils and some really jarring head movements ! Xoxo - AT

143
3 minutes ago

Capturing life one picture at a time 📸Shot with Sony A7ii : 85mm | 1/125 | f1.4 | 800 iso Model : daladieceo

41
3 minutes ago

Versión 1.0 de englishmaninnewyork de theofficialsting. Iba a subir esto algún rato cuando me salga perfecto pero más bien le subo ahorita y estoy abierto a consejos, comentarios, sugerencias de tanto capo saxofonista que anda suelto por ahí Any comment or suggestion is welcome from all those monster sax players surfing on IG. “Take lessons” is not a suggestion 😂 sax cover music saxophone musician musica

60
4 minutes ago

What better way to spend a rainy Monday than vibing to jasonisbell. Hope you guys enjoy this cover of “Cover Me Up”. 🎥: aaronconnercreative

61
5 minutes ago

Way Down We Go

121
9 minutes ago

No one gives a shit but i’m 4 weeks binge free and i’ve been losing a loot of weight with how intensely i’ve been working out 🏋️‍♀️ 🙂👏🏼 *pat on the back*

16
1 week ago

Leiser - Lea 🎤

13012
7 months ago

Neko Case wants to write songs that can’t be tamed. Even her hookiest tunes come with twists and turns that clearly didn’t crib from the pop songwriting rule book. “Hell-On” (Anti-), her seventh studio album and first in five years, is among her catchiest albums and also one of the most elusive and allusive, full of yearning for a planet that is leaking mystery like a punctured balloon. There’s a yearning at the core of “Hell-On,” but it’s not framed in the more traditional iterations of that term. There’s a distinct lack of melodrama or confessional detail, the self-pity or regret that accompany a broken romance or a broken life. Instead, Case yearns for the unseen. Her persistent themes have revolved around nature as a muse, a predator, a living being, an eternal, unconquerable riddle. The title track sets a confiding but eerie atmosphere as the storyteller gathers a few friends around a campfire. She unspools a tale about God and her creation, a natural world that can’t be controlled, despite humankind’s efforts to tame and despoil it. “You’ll not be my master, you’re barely my guest,” Case sings. As usual, Case is not only the singer, but a multi-instrumentalist and producer who treats songs as myths and parables. In “Last Lion of Albion,” she pays homage to the mother of Romulus and Remus, her image and legacy co-opted and embalmed. Yet its discontent comes veiled in a big chorus (the track, like several others on the album, was co-produced by Bjorn Yttling of the Swedish band Peter Bjorn & John). “Halls of Sarah” is about another forgotten female historical figure, an acoustic folk song augmented by braying baritone saxophone and rhythmic, wordless backing vocals. “Winnie” looks “off the edge of the world” to find “the girl who changed everything” and give her some long overdue props. The arrangements mirror Case’s concerns as a lyricist: She’s protective of the natural world and also envious of it. Her songs are about a kind of freedom that her narrators can’t always find in their own lives. Little wonder she closes the album with the exhilarating rush of “Pitch or Honey,” a song that yearns to race “out of reach of human hands.”

2808
7 months ago

J Balvin has concocted an inescapable eclectic mix of sounds, textures and sensibilities, which shouldn't have a problem overcoming any language barriers. Vibras, or “vibes” in Spanish, is defiantly Latin, but it is also in direct conversation with what’s happening in American pop—especially the pop that draws its direct ancestry from hip-hop. If it’s no longer important for rappers to be skilled lyricists, then the vibe rules supreme. Can you ride the beat? Can you nail the melody and make people move? If you can, it really doesn’t matter what words are said. Just set the vibe. If the words are less important than the vibe, then why should the language matter? While Vibras is rooted in reggaetón, the beats are draped in dancehall and a dash of trap production techniques, with nods to salsa, bachata, and Afrobeat. Even for an American audience, it’s hard to classify this as global music when it often feels strangely familiar. Music that tries to appeal to everyone often appeals to no one, Vibras' inclusiveness is a plus. It is the most accurate representation of J Balvin as an artist; he’s not just trying to seduce the women in his songs, but us, the listener, as well. While Vibras is certainly engineered for the mainstream, its diversity is crucial to its identity; a straight reggaetón record softened up for mainstream consumption would feel shallow and cynical. And while the blurring of distinct genres often makes for new, exciting music, in the case of reggaetón it runs the risk of erasing the progenitors in Panama and Puerto Rico who built a counter-culture only to watch it run away from them in the mainstream. And it’s no coincidence that as reggaetón moves from the streets to Spotify, its biggest hits would be delivered by light-skinned artists with family-friendly overtones. But Balvin, who grew up wealthy but was relegated to the slums when his father’s business failed, has long straddled both worlds. On Vibras, he’s poised to take his place on the global stage—mi gente in tow.

2919
7 months ago

Few songwriters capture the power and the humor of the mundane as well as Courtney Barnett. On her first two releases, the smashing double EP A Sea of Split Peas from 2013 and the uneven Sometimes I Sit and Think, and Sometimes I Just Sit from 2015, that seemed to be her calling — taking droll account of the small crises we face and the subtle personality differences we marry into. On her new album, Tell Me How You Really Feel, it’s as if Barnett is taking the advice of the title. There’s a more direct quality to her lyrics this time around, and a more honest quality to her delivery, even when she takes on themes she has already addressed in earlier songs — being on the road, dealing with loneliness, looking for home, insecurity, and writer’s block. Her emotions are less muted by clever lines here, less protected by her sardonic talk-singing. On “Sunday Roast,” she is more in touch with a deeper self-awareness and a longer view, closer to what she really feels, as she sings, “I know all your stories/ But I’ll listen to them again.” On her remarkable 2017 collaboration with Kurt Vile, Lotta Sea Lice, the pair — whose phrasing and love of pretty hooks are perfectly matched — sang about incessant travel as disorienting but in some way charming. On Tell Me, Barnett is willing to be more vulnerable as she notes, in “City Looks Pretty,” “Friends treat you like a stranger and/ Strangers treat you like their best friend, oh well.” The openness and exhausted anger — they’re on the super catchy “Charity,” too — carry with them an air of catharsis and relief. On the tuneful “Nameless, Faceless,” she goes after Internet trolls with a biting takedown and a melody that recall early Liz Phair. The bottom line is that nearly every song on the new Courtney Barnett album has something to recommend it — a familiar melody that takes distinctive turns, a lyric that grows deeper with each listening, strong backup from a band led by Barnett’s rough-hewn guitar riffs. No, it’s not the Great Perfect Courtney Barnett Album I’ve been waiting for since first hearing her. But given the promise of her earlier work, it’s a thrill to hear her continue to move forward.

2036
7 months ago

Electric Light is alI over the place stylistically, James Bay has weaved together a variety of extravagant differences. But is it too much chaos and not enough calm? From the indie-rock anthem "Pink Lemonade" to the pastiche "In My Head," Bay ditches the bluesy apparel for ruthlessly efficient pop. Hip-hop style spoken-word skits make up the interludes, while he explores a diverse array of techniques and sounds; from the overall ambient whir of "Wild Love," to the gospel float of "Us." Fuzzy-toned "Sugar Drunk High" introduces a Prince-like twist and "Fade Out" has the former dream-woozy R&B arrangements. The house-funk of "Wasted On Each Other" quite simply bangs, with its foot-stomping pop elements. Oozing with confidence, "Wanderlust" reeks of Fleetwood Mac, as the trippy, drawling lyrical delivery and sweet twang of the guitar recalls legendary tracks "Everywhere" and "Dreams." Laced with a swaggering, velvety guitar line on the opening of "I Found You," Bay melts into a lolling, gospel-infused blues feel. Similarly, "Stand Up" boasts distorted vocals and moments that truly take your breath away. "Just For Tonight" adopts themes of escapism but almost feels too similar to "Hold Back The River" — nevertheless still providing a catchy chorus. While producer Paul Epworth’s contribution is accomplished, adding a dynamism that maintains our attention throughout, the record seems to lack an underlying theme. Bay has been a bit too clever for his own good, and on Electric Light fails to latch onto an identity that makes him truly unique.