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18,799,206 Photos and Videos

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🔸🔸🔸🔸🔸🔸🔸🔸🔸🔸🔸🔸🔸🔸🔸🔸🔸 Banda: Marilyn Manson Canción: The Beautiful People Album: Antichrist Superstar (1996) para más covers siganme y no olviden de dejar su like, me ayuda muchísimo 😆😄😄. Temazo 🔶🔶🔶🔶🔶🔶🔶🔶🔶🔶🔶🔶🔶🔶🔶🔶🔶 Tags: 😃⤵⤵⤵⤵⤵⤵⤵ videos videograph video videoo videogram videostar videography videooftheday musicvideo metal music instavideo instagram instamusic instalike instafollow awesome amazing argentina covers cover guitarcover guitar like likeforlikes follow4followback followforfollowback siguemeytesigo marilynmanson ⚫⚫⚫⚫⚫⚫⚫⚫⚫⚫⚫⚫⚫⚫⚫⚫⚫

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комета - jony.me ☄️🙈 Как же я обожаю его песни 😍 Отмечайте jony.me и raavamusic в комментариях🙈♥️ Отдельное спасибо mnogonotka , под такую игру на фортепиано всегда приятно петь🙈😍 ———————————— raavamusic jony.me russiansingers russiansingers cover_pushka каверсозведздой_jony singers.live singers.ru musically_cover cover_talant cover_group_rus muz.cover arm_talant_ talant_videos _problem_chka_ cover_group_rus talant.russia cover_hype singer.ru cover jony cometa singer кавер видео музыка джони комета сингер 🙈🙏🏻

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I love this "Flowers" instrumental created by the late J Dilla (I don't own any rights to the beat/track) but I was drawn in when I 1st heard it a while back and wrote my own version of a song to it “Gladly” wish I could have worked with him. ✊🏿 producers track cover hiphop music listen vocalist vocals beat beats dj hiphopmusic remake instrumentals singers song songwriter hiphop artist musiccover musicians singer musiclover musically love unique sound singersongwriter genre instamusic

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DiSave Disini Ngiringin Ade Gw Nyanyi😁🎶😍 musik guitar cover

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오늘 하루도 그렇습니다🤩 이번년도는 사랑을 많이 받아서 행복합니다❤️(냠냠) - selfie 합정 읽어보시집

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пора знакомится, хоть тысячи ещё нет) кавер на песню «Лето»☀️ My name is Lika 😆 Я получилась немного упоротая, ну да ладно) простите что без музыки 🤭 Давайте тегать Вику, чтоб заметила🍒💕 • • vikishow_official rozaraa sea21sea • • ВикиШоу ВикиШоуОфишал ВикаСоловьева VikiShow VikiShowOfficial Summer2019 Cover Лето Вишенки

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ATEEZ ❤️ A glimpse of ateez_official_ 's perfomance yesterday at SmartfrenWOW WOWconcert 🔥 . 8 makes 1 team! 👑 Hongjoong Seonghwa Wooyoung Yeosang Yunho MinGi Jongho (-) MinGi . SWIPE TO SEE THEIR PERFROMANCES 💥 . Wave ➡️ Say My Name ➡️ Hala Hala . IT WILL BE UP ON MY YOUTUBE CHANNEL (LINK IN MY BIO) 😚😚 . *Ignore my fangirling voice (maafin juga salah-salah lirik 😂) Welcome_To_Indonesia_ATEEZ ATEEZ ATEEZinJKT OURAURORA_FINALLY_HERE CodeDC CodeDCIndonesia CodeNameA Atiny Wave SayMyName HalaHala Illusion dance dancefamily dancecover cover

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dunamalyan01 ✴️I CAN FLY✴️ Никогда в жизни никому ничего не доказывайте ,особенно тем , кто этого ждёт от Вас больше всего Значит он меньше всех Вам верит , ценит и доверяет🖤🎙️ icanfly cover coversong instavideo crazy true кавер талант круто песни музыка лайв творчество blackstar radio правдажизни красиво music

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Chaos im Kopf. Kennst du den Moment, wenn du zum vierten Mal die gleiche Zeile in deinem Buch liest? Die Worte kommen einfach nicht richtig an und der Inhalt schon gar nicht. Was wollte der Autor damit jetzt sagen? Noch eine Runde. Irgendwann klappst du das Buch zu, weil du merkst „das macht gerade weder Sinn noch Spaß“. Solche Situationen haben wir im echten Leben auch. Da wo wir die Geschichtenschreiber sind. Doch anstatt dass wir das „Buch“ zur Seite legen und eine Pause machen, versuchen wir es weiter und weiter. Die Kreativität ist weg, die Motivation hat sich verabschiedet und der Stress macht sich breit. Trau dich Pausen zu machen, denn sie werden dich weiterbringen. Und wenn du es nicht immer schaffst, weil eine Deadline vor der Tür steht, dann nimm dir am Wochenende zwei Stunden für dich. Ohne Verabredung, Whats App Nachrichten, Anrufe oder dem Fernseher. Setz dich mit deinen Gedanken auseinander. Lass deine Fantasie schweifen und stell dich deinem Labyrinth im Kopf. Du wirst hinaus finden. miucoco labyrinth chaos lockenkopf weg pause coaching düsseldorf flipchart orange

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⠀ 닐로 -지나오다 cover ⠀ Profile link 👉

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5 months later and she actually has content out! There is a new cover up on my youtube channel of one of my favourite songs and it would be highly appreciated if you gave it a listen! Link in my bio and hope you enjoy ✨

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6 hours ago

풀버전은 제 피드에 적힌 유튜브로 가시면 됩니다

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3 weeks ago

It’s been some 26 years since Sheryl Crow dominated the early 90s with her runaway smash hit folk-rock country-lite extravaganza Tuesday Night Music Club. There have since been 9 albums all treading different sonic paths and showcasing her versatility and authenticity as an artist. Threads will seemingly be Crow’s 11th and final studio album proper and features collaborations and duets certainly fit for a fantastic swansong with Eric Clapton, Keith Richards, Willie Nelson, Kris Kristofferson, Emmylou Harris, James Taylor and Vince Gill among the many buckling up for the ride. The opener "Prove you Wrong" is a knee-slapping, country-rock jive featuring Stevie Nicks and new country sensation Maren Morris. One of the album’s standouts, "Tell Me When It’s Over," evokes the iconic "If It Makes You Happy," albeit less nihilistic and more realistic, and could make for a more discerning take on the narrative of "My Favourite Mistake." This bittersweet bluesy pre-break up jam is simply gorgeous and the vocals from Crow and Chris Stapleton are delightfully canorous, like honey to one’s ears.  Known for her political lyrics and activism, Crow lambasts politics, gun violence and greed to fine effect here. "Story of Everything" is a gorgeous funk soulscape featuring the brilliant Chuck D, Andra Day and Gary Clark Jr. on guitar and wanders through the state of America right now from racial issues to politicians to social care. There are also some stunning mid-tempo love ballads with Eric Clapton, Sting and Brandi Carlile providing support on the cinematic "Beware Of Darkness." "Cross Creek Road" with Lukas Nelson and Neil  is gilt-edged country rock and "The Worst" featuring Keith Richards is sparse, yet stirring. "Nobody’s Perfect" with Emmylou Harris is bittersweet country at its best. For The Sake Of Love with Vince Gill is simply soaring. The album’s highlight is the blindsiding "Don’t" with indie outfit Lucius. This retro, and almost Bacharachian, slice of powerful orchestral pop seemingly comes out of nowhere and will raise many an arm hair. If Crow’s album charge has been eclectic, then Threads is a victory lap of the genres she has triumphantly explored.

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3 weeks ago

REVIEW REWIND: It's tempting to interpret the title of Sheryl Crow’s 10th album, Be Myself, as a declarative statement, suggesting a return after a series of forays into holiday music, Southern soul, and country. The album doesn’t just reprise the roots-rock pop of Crow’s early releases, reuniting the singer-songwriter with longtime collaborator Jeff Trott, but it also puts engineer Tchad Blake back on the mixing board for the first time since 1998’s The Globe Sessions. The title track itself, however, conveys something entirely less rhetorical. “Hanging with the hipsters is a lot of hard work,” Crow grumbles like she’s sitting in a rocking chair on her front lawn. At which point, she proceeds to rattle off a litany of buzzy references to selfies, Uber, juice bars, and social media that would have felt strained two years ago. Escaping technological dependency is a recurring theme on Be Myself, and thankfully Crow’s hankering for some real-life face time feels less forced on bona fide toe-tappers like “Roller Skate” and “Grow Up.” Crow’s voice is spry throughout Be Myself, retaining the country lilt she honed in Nashville on songs like “Alone in the Dark” and “Long Way Back,” while the influence of Memphis soul can be heard on lead single “Halfway There.” These specters of her last two genre-based efforts render the album an application of cumulative influences rather than just a rehash of the singer’s pop heyday. The schmaltz suggested by the title of “Love Will Save the Day,” a self-care anthem for the Trump era, is tempered with an understated performance from Crow and thoughtfully mixed backing vocals, surface-noise loops, and moody strings. Be Myself might lack the quirks that made Sheryl Crow so distinctive, but the album proves that some alliances can outlast even the latest planet-shrinking technology.

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4 weeks ago

On her seventh album, the pop mega-force leaves behind the anger that fuelled its predecessor, Reputation instead opting for open-hearted love songs The title of Taylor Swift’s seventh album isn’t misleading. After 2017’s bitter and combative Reputation, she’s returned to the wide-eyed but incisive romantic pop that made her a superstar. It’s telling that terrible lead single "Me!" has been relegated to track 16 at the tail end of the album. With playful lyrics like “I know that I’m a handful, baby," it’s supposed to be a sparkling reintroduction to Swift’s fun side, but tries too hard and ends up sounding like a jingle for a cheesy TV ad. Thankfully, it’s one of only two major misfires. The other, spare opening track "I Forgot You Existed," is a tedious Reputation retread. Much of Lover is far more infectious. “‘I love you’ – ain’t that the worst thing you ever heard?’” Swift sings knowingly on "Cruel Summer," a brilliant pop song co-written with Annie “St. Vincent” Clark. The equally fantastic "I Think He Knows" tip-toes as close to funk as Swift can get away with, and peaks with one of those economical-yet-evocative lyrics that she built her pre-Reputation reputation on. Other Lover highlights are more stripped back. The title track is a lovely, dusky nugget that suggests Swift could have been an alt-country singer if she’d wanted. The glistening synth-pop of "The Archer," is home to another excellent melody, benefits from an effortlessness and lightness of touch. Despite the odd dud, Lover is a welcome reminder of her songwriting skills and ability to craft sonically inviting pop music. Together with co-producers including Jack “Bleachers” Antonoff and Joel Little (Lorde, Khalid), she’s made another slick and accessible record flecked with surprising production flourishes. To call Lover a comeback feels like a reach considering that Reputation, her lowest-selling album to date, still went triple Platinum in the US. So let’s just say that the old Taylor can’t come to the phone right now – ‘cause she’s busy writing songs that suit her again.

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1 month ago

It has been through their subtle imagery that Bon Iver’s albums have followed a flawless pattern. 2008’s For Emma, Forever Ago painted a bleak winter, the eponymous follow-up evoked a frenzied spring, and 22, A Millionfound Bon Iver in the full bloom of summer. We now approach autumn in the world of Bon Iver, a new season that doesn’t arrive without its own set of chaos. Introduced by “Yi” and sharply followed by “iMi," both tracks are illustrated by a daunting and echoing radio static which carries the distorted vocals on its burdened shoulders. The lyrics “I like you / And that ain’t nothing new” as the song draws to a close provide a stark comedown from all the madness. It is not all chaotic, however. Moments of atmospheric bliss that have become commonplace on Bon Iver records are still intact on this instalment. “Faith” is emphasised by an impactful, crashing crescendo, whilst “Holyfields,” with its climbing synths paint a steady and assured track. Tangled in amongst the usual quirks of Bon Iver’s craft lie moments of sheer pop genius. “Hey, Ma” being the most exceptional. A song fit for radio and the pinnacle of easy listening, it further demonstrates their universal appeal. “U Man (Like)," though contrasting many of Iver’s previous work, is nothing short of remarkable. The pop-esque melodies and the cool and sophisticated feel make it truly irresistible. This is an album that you can feel as well as experience, perhaps the most complete Bon Iver album to date. Justin Vernon’s emotive approach to the album balances the individual and the communal with perfect precision. With a firmer grasp on reality and a new and brighter perspective, a unique mix of creativity and bewilderment remains at the core of Bon Iver.

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1 month ago

The bedroom-pop songs that Clairo, née Claire Cottrill, has released since her 2017 breakout, “Pretty Girl,” have often seemed like they’ve been transmitted from behind a glass wall. Mining the pain of adolescence, and her generalized lyrics can have a distancing effect. So, it’s surprising when the 20-year-old opens her debut album, Immunity, by revisiting the night a friend prevented her from committing suicide. The rest of the album is just as raw and covered in open wounds. Produced by former Vampire Weekend member Rostam Batmanglij, Immunity is steeped in warm acoustics, a sharp pivot from the synth palette that Clairo has previously favored. At the center of it all, though, is Cottrill herself. Her characteristically impassive vocal strikes a poignant contrast with her lyrics. On “White Flag,” her voice icily glides over reedy guitars and synths as she laments, “I was 15 when I first felt loneliness.” Cottrill, who came out as bisexual last year, embraces her sexuality in a way that’s pensive and unreserved. “Sofia” conjures a sweet vision of queer love over a chugging, anthemic guitar: “I think we could do it if we tried/Sofia, know that you and I shouldn’t feel like a crime.” “Bags,” finds Cottrill navigating the line between friend and lover with a crush who could be straight. Her approach pinpoints ephemeral moments with a wide-eyed recollection: the sensation of fingertips on her back, a mane of hair blowing in the wind, a love interest standing in a doorway. In spite of its title, the central theme of Immunity is fragility. Time and time again, Cottrill reveals how susceptible she is to unshakable loneliness (“White Flag”), the inevitable growing apart of lovers (“Impossible”), the physical limitations caused by her rheumatoid arthritis (“I Wouldn’t Ask You”). But it’s evident that Cottrill is done feigning immunity. Life, Cottrill tells us, is full of loose ends, lingering emotions, and unfinished business. When reconciling these limitations proves difficult, if not impossible, Cottrill turns inward to find a sense of certainty to hold fast to.

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1 month ago

Lil Nas X’s “Old Town Road” has burrowed itself into the consciousness of an entire nation, managing to stay at No. 1 for countless weeks and elbowing out Elmo on the elementary-school popularity index. It’s part luck, part genius, part of the YeeHaw agenda, a song so unstoppable, it has actually shifted the status quo of country music and is currently one of the biggest singles—and memes—of all time. On Lil Nas X’s debut 7—a 19-minute EP bookended with the Billy Ray Cyrus remix and the original version of “Old Town Road”—he opens himself up to the criticism that “Old Town Road” bypassed. Each new song on 7 is an attempt at stumbling into another lighthearted hit. We don’t learn a single thing about Lil Nas X on 7 other than he might have actually been born in a Reddit test tube in 2018. His collaborations with the production duo Take A Daytrip are soulless. On “Panini,” Lil Nas X has a droll personality unaided by the gimmicks of his signature hit. So it makes sense that “Rodeo,” his second track with Take A Daytrip, is a desperate return to the bulletproof cowboy persona. “Rodeo” hits all the beats of 2018’s “Mo Bamba” and feels like Lil Nas X just praying that the “Old Town Road” goodwill has enough legs to latch onto this single. It probably does. For the entirety of 7, it’s unclear if Lil Nas X actually likes music. He uses a lazy, out-of-tune melody on the reflective “Kick It,” a song that looks back on the past six months. Then, there’s the sloppy finale “C7osure (You Like),” which sounds like B.o.B. got hired to make a J.C. Penney commercial in 2010. Eventually, one of these songs on 7 will draft behind the still-overwhelming charm of “Old Town Road” and find success of its own, and Lil Nas X will be there online, with his savvy internet wit, ready to saddle up and burn another meme to the ground. What he lacks in musicality he makes up for in Instagram followers, boots he can strap on whenever he needs to remind people that he’s the great unifier, the one who tore down the walls of a genre. When that’s all over, what’s left will be “Old Town Road,” an all-time hall-of-fame pop hit that will one day be explained with an “I guess you had to be there.”

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1 month ago

There is transformative power coursing through the 12 songs on Emily Alone, the new album from indie-folk project Florist. It’s not loud or showy or self-serving or generous. It’s just there, simple and plainspoken, waiting to be engaged and willing to move through anyone who needs it. Presumably, that’s what happened to Emily Sprague, the singer-songwriter named in the album’s title. Last winter, she wrote and recorded Emily Alone during a period of isolation and personal reflection spurred by the death of her mother and a move across the country. On Emily Alone, Sprague strips down her songs to their barest elements, leaving only her voice, words and plucked acoustic guitar to carry the message. What’s left is not just bedroom-recorded confessional music, but pure introspection, confusion, and emotion rubbed raw and exposed to the world. These songs are not sad so much as they channel the ebbs and flows of life lived inside a human brain with startling accuracy. “I write and I read / I spend time in the sea, but nothing brings clarity to what makes me me,” Sprague sings in “As Alone,” the album’s opener. She knows enough, though, to comfort herself from the second-person point of view later in the song: “Emily, just know that you’re not as alone as you feel in the dark,” she sings over and over as her guitar seesaws back and forth between two chords. The songs on Emily Alone sound similar to one another. But listen closely and you’ll find their subtle differences. There are tracks that are more melodic, such as “Moon Begins,” with its hypnotic finger-picking and airy chorus about death and love, and “Now,” which pairs the album’s catchiest melody with a traditional-sounding folk-guitar pattern. On “Ocean Arms,” Sprague hangs the faint drone of a synthesizer behind her whispered vocals: “Why do I feel so happy when I stare at the ocean?” she sings. “Then devastated when I stare at the ocean?” Does this sound like something that would appeal to everyone? Perhaps you have to be in the right place for Emily Alone to impact you fully. But if you’re there, you’ll feel it. And if you’re not there, that’s OK. When you’re ready, Florist will be there waiting for you.

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1 month ago

“I got high expectations. You’re gonna have to get this right”. On her highly anticipated debut album, Mabel opens with what seems to be a sentiment aimed at herself more than anyone else. A rising star in the UK’s music scene, the 23-year-old comes from a musical dynasty so the pressure to perform comes down on her twofold and, thankfully, she doesn’t let us down. There’s a natural coolness to Mabel. Raised in Sweden by her parents Neneh Cherry – yes, the Neneh Cherry of Buffalo Stance fame – and Cameron McVey, who produced albums for Massive Attack and All Saints, and carrying a north London twang, she had no chance of being anything but compelling. Where most artists her age would have had to cut their teeth on cutesie tunes for a younger audience, she cuts straight to the chase with this slick and very mature R&B album. "Don’t Call Me Up," a dancehall-inspired pop rocket, is undoubtedly one of the songs of the summer – nay, the year – with its anthemic chorus and cataclysmic, bass-heavy breakdown that causes a tremble on the dance floor. Using attitude as armour, she delivers an all or nothing stance on the pulsating and self-destructive "We Don’t Say," which sounds like a response to the narcotically-charged music of The Weeknd, and running off a recharged playground chant and clap beat, she taunts a lover into giving her more on "Selfish Love." On ballads like "Trouble" and "I Belong To Me," she lets down her guard and gives an insight into her more sensitive side. In these raw moments, she cuts back on the low-slung, slurred affectations – ones that Ariana Grande favours on her latest albums – and puts more power into her vocals. Very much a zeitgeist pop star, Mabel has tapped into the unfazed pop style that singers like Dua Lipa, Rihanna and, more recently, Billie Eilish have been flooding the charts with for the last couple of years. Unfortunately, this means that the production on the album feels too safe or too familiar at times. Few songs on the record pound as hard as "Don’t Call Me Up" but as she progresses in her career, hopefully she’ll stop riding the popular chart trends and will soon be the one who creates them.