popculture

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1 minute ago

Habits sneak up on you lightly You see them only when they’ve gotten hold of you quite tightly They stay right there like that uninvited guest The one who overstays his welcome, all at his own behest It doesn’t rule you, you say every moment you get But internally you know you’re losing this mental bet Does a problem exist if one doesn’t see it? Habits, in this gray area of existence, are a perfect fit PoetryOfLife Habitsdiehard Habitual chaitime busesofindia kadakchai sadakchap streetsofindia peopleofindia coloursofindia poetsofindia poetsofinstagram rhymewithoutreason visualstorytelling visualpoetry englishpoetry wordsmith bihar sheisnotlost originalwork publictransport streetart popculture popart yoga meditation spirituality travellingyogi shotoniphone portraitphotography

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9 minutes ago

🎶give me, someone to laaavaa🎶

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9 minutes ago

While growing up,there was a whole lot of movie heroes than we wanted to model ourselves by,this guy was my one. I guess still to this day,I kinda wish I was hahaha. When it came down to it, there was two main players that gave us some of the biggest cult movies of our generation and they were Steven Spielberg and/or George Lucas,and this movie had the magic touch from both of them. Also dont forget ma man Harrison Ford for playing some of the most iconic roles ever.

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16 minutes ago

📝 : "Natalia Alianovna Romanova, Natasha Romanoff, Nat, Natasha Romanova, Natalie Rushman, Yelena Belova, Наталья Альяновна "Наташа" Романова" 🕴: bandainamcous ™ Avengers: Infinity War (Black Widow) 📷 : Canon EOS 1200D blackwidow natasharomanoff nataliaromanova avengers ageofultron avengersinfinitywar avengersendgame captainamerica civilwar wintersoldier ironman hulk marvel popculture actionfigure toys mainan dulinan ikidolanan photography instafigure instago instagood instacollage instadaily instapic instagram canon eos 1200d

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25 minutes ago

So. Many. Fucking. Emotions🌹🌹🌹🌹🌹🌹

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26 minutes ago

this was my first ever figure, I’m 99.99% sure it’s a fake which is fine. My parents bought it for me for my 13th birthday so it was the thought that counts 🥺 He’s actually in poor condition because I had no idea what I was doing to take care of him but I love him all he same

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27 minutes ago

Lady Godiva likes her privacy.

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30 minutes ago

I love acoustic session cause it bring intimacy to the next level. Still last Saturday hype, what an awesome night! Swipe left. thatslifemoment

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32 minutes ago

3days Hooray👽👽👽

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33 minutes ago

For those of you who haven't checked out my website yet, it's wewriteshit.com, THE LINK IS IN THE BIO, so go there, check it out and explore, we got tons of content out there with me currently doing the GOT reviews and Movie reviews with more Flash stuff planned from today, so check out the reviews and articles, support the blog people! SUBSCRIBE TO THE NEWSLETTER, AND FOLLOW wewriteshit on Instagram Your support means a lot guys So check it out Also we are accepting writing submissions so those who want to write for us can contact me writers writeforus wewriteshit popculture gameofthronesseason8 gameofthrones battleofwinterfell avengersendgame endgame avengers theflash arrow supergirl legendsoftomorrow

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1 week ago

1960s: The Vietnam War was a long, costly and divisive conflict that pitted the communist government of North Vietnam against South Vietnam and its principal ally, the United States. The conflict was intensified by the ongoing Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union. More than 3 million people (including over 58,000 Americans) were killed in the Vietnam War, and more than half of the dead were Vietnamese civilians. The My Lai massacre was one of the most horrific incidents of violence committed against unarmed civilians during the Vietnam War. A company of American soldiers brutally killed most of the people—women, and old men—in the village of My Lai on March 16, 1968. More than 500 people were slaughtered in the My Lai massacre, including girls and women who were raped and mutilated before being killed. U.S. Army officers covered up the carnage for a year before it was reported in the American press, sparking a firestorm of international outrage. The brutality of the My Lai killings and the official cover-up fueled anti-war sentiment and further divided the United States over the Vietnam War. For my illustration on the 1960s, see the link in my bio.

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1 week ago

1960s: Bob Dylan’s performance at the Newport Folk Festival in 1965 is widely regarded as one of the pivotal moments in the history of rock music. In March 1965, Dylan released his fifth album, Bringing It All Back Home. Side one features Dylan backed by an electric band; side two features Dylan accompanying himself on acoustic guitar. On July 20, 1965, Dylan released his single "Like a Rolling Stone", featuring a rock sound. On July 25, 1965, Dylan performed his first electric concert at the Newport Folk Festival, joined by guitarist Mike Bloomfield and Barry Goldberg of the Paul Butterfield Blues Band. Some sections of the audience booed Dylan's performance, leading members of the folk movement, including Irwin Silber and Ewan MacColl, to criticize Dylan for moving away from political songwriting and for performing with an electric band instead. For my illustration on the 1960s, see the link in my bio.

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1 week ago

1960s: The Ford Mustang, a two-seat, mid-engine sports car, is officially unveiled by Henry Ford II at the World’s Fair in Flushing Meadows, New York, on April 17, 1964. That same day, the new car also debuted in Ford showrooms across America and almost 22,000 Mustangs were immediately snapped up by buyers. Named for a World War II fighter plane, the Mustang was the first of a type of vehicle that came to be known as a “pony car”; a car classification for affordable, compact, highly styled coupés or convertibles with a sporty or performance-oriented image. Ford sold more than 400,000 Mustangs within its first year of production, far exceeding sales expectations. For my illustration on the 1960s, see the link in my bio.

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1 week ago

1960s: French singer-songwriter Serge Gainsbourg is equally famous for his number one hits as his romances with Brigitte Bardot and Jane Birkin. Here are his five most scandalous moments from the 1960s: 1. in 1966, Gainsbourg penned the song Les Sucettes (Lollipops) for singer France Gall: The story of a girl who is “in paradise” every time “that little stick is on her tongue”. Upon discovering the dual meaning of the risqué lyrics, Gall refused to perform the song and never worked with, nor spoke to Gainsbourg again. 2. He had an affair with the already married Brigitte Bardot. This was despite being so intimidated by her stunning looks that on the date that he lost all of the wit and charisma that he was renowned for 3. Recording songs in steamy, sweaty vocal booths with Brigitte Bardot. Throughout the two-hour session, sound engineer William Flageollet claimed to have witnessed “heavy petting” in the vocal booth while the sighs and whispers were committed to tape. 4. Enticing and entrapping a English rose, Jane Birkin. Distraught after the collapse of his relationship with Bardot, Gainsbourg occupied himself with a role in the 1969 film Slogan. Playing opposite him was a charming, English actor called Jane Birkin. Under the impression that her co-star hated her, Birkin arranged a dinner with him over which Gainsbourg, 18 years her senior, fell in love. 5. Getting banned by radio due to explicit content in the song “Je T’aime Moi Non Plus”. In the UK, it was the first No 1 to be banned by the BBC due to its explicit content. It was also banned in Spain, Sweden, Italy and even on French radio before 11pm. For my illustration on the 1960s, see the link in my bio.

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1 week ago

1960s: Star Trek debuted on television in 1966 and aired for three seasons on NBC. It followed the interstellar adventures of Captain James T. Kirk (William Shatner) and his crew aboard the starship USS Enterprise, a space exploration vessel built by the United Federation of Planets in the 23rd century. While the show initially enjoyed high ratings, the average rating of the show at the end of its first season dropped to 52nd out of 94 programs. Unhappy with the show's ratings, NBC threatened to cancel the show during its second season. The show's fan base, led by Bjo Trimble, conducted an unprecedented letter-writing campaign, petitioning the network to keep the show on the air. NBC renewed the show, but moved it from primetime to the "Friday night death slot", and substantially reduced its budget.[20] In protest Roddenberry, resigned as producer and reduced his direct involvement in Star Trek, which led to Fred Freiberger becoming producer for the show's third and final season.[b] Despite another letter-writing campaign, NBC canceled the series after three seasons and 79 episodes. Regardless, Star Trek went on to become a giant space opera media franchise with it’s devoted fanbase being known as ‘Trekkies’. For my illustration on the 1960s, see the link in my bio.

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1 week ago

1960s: The Factory was artist’s Andy Warhol New York City studio. Famed for its groundbreaking parties, The Factory was the hip hangout for artistic types, amphetamine users, and the Warhol ‘superstars’. In the studio, Warhol’s workers would make silkscreens and lithographs under his direction. Many of the people around Andy were the sons and daughters of the wealthy bourgeois collectors of his works such as Edie Sedgwick. For my illustration on the 1960s, see the link in my bio.

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2 weeks ago

An illustrated homage to the Swinging Sixties. Can you guess all the references? For my full illustration on the 1960s, see the link in my bio.

231
2 weeks ago

An illustrated homage to the Swinging Sixties. Can you guess all the references? For my full illustration on the 1960s, see the link in my bio.

311
2 weeks ago

An illustrated homage to the Swinging Sixties. Can you guess all the references? For my full illustration on the 1960s, see the link in my bio.

191
2 weeks ago

An illustrated homage to the Swinging Sixties. Can you guess all the references? For my full illustration on the 1960s, see the link in my bio.

232
2 weeks ago

An illustrated homage to the Swinging Sixties. Can you guess all the references? For my full illustration on the 1960s, see the link in my bio.

352
2 weeks ago

An illustrated homage to the Swinging Sixties. Can you guess all the references? For my full illustration on the 1960s, see the link in my bio.

192
2 weeks ago

An illustrated homage to the Swinging Sixties. Can you guess all the references? For my full illustration on the 1960s, see the link in my bio.

371
2 weeks ago

An illustrated homage to the Swinging Sixties. Can you guess all the references? For my full illustration on the 1960s, see the link in my bio.

243
2 weeks ago

An illustrated homage to the Swinging Sixties. Can you guess all the references? For my full illustration on the 1960s, see the link in my bio.

351
2 weeks ago

An illustrated homage to the Swinging Sixties. Can you guess all the references? For my full illustration on the 1960s, see the link in my bio.

202
2 weeks ago

An illustrated homage to the Swinging Sixties. Can you guess all the references? For my full illustration on the 1960s, see the link in my bio.

241
2 weeks ago

1960s: When Muhammad Ali floored Sonny Liston in their title-bout rematch in Lewiston, Maine, on May 25, 1965, a legend was born. Or, perhaps more accurately, a legendary boxing controversy was born. Ali (the former Cassius Clay, who had taken his now-famous Muslim name after defeating Liston in their first title bout in 1964) knocked Liston out with a first-round right hand to the head that, all these years later, is still known as the "phantom punch." After all, an awful lot of people who were at the fight that night never saw, or later claimed that they never saw, the punch that floored Liston. Others, including Sports Illustrated's Tex Maule, were adamant that the punch was hardly a phantom, but instead was a perfectly timed blow that legitimately rocked the former champ. In the years after the fight, various theories have been floated in order to explain what some fight fans simply can't or don't want to accept — namely, that Ali beat Liston, period. For my illustration on the 1960s, see the link in my bio.

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2 weeks ago

1960s: ‘In Cold Blood’, a novel by American author Truman Capote is first published in 1966. It details the 1959 murders of four members of the Herbert Clutter family in the small farming community of Holcomb, Kansas. The novel opens a window on the dark underbelly of postwar America. In Cold Blood, subtitled “A True Account of a Multiple Murder and Its Consequences”, grandly described by Capote as “a non-fiction novel”, actually began as a New York Times murder story that became transformed into a tale of spine-tingling suspense and extraordinary intuition. It was Capote’s genius to understand that this midwest killing had a mythic quality, and that the sinister murderers opened up the dark underbelly of postwar America. During the early hours of 15 November 1959, in the small prairie community of Holcomb, Kansas, four members of a prosperous farming family, the Clutters, were savagely murdered by shotgun blasts discharged at close quarters into their faces. There was no apparent motive for the crime, and hardly any clues. The local FBI investigator, Alvin Dewey, had never seen a crime so meaningless or “so vicious”, and vowed to hunt down and convict the killers, whatever the cost. More darkly, the backstory to Capote’s book became a private tragedy, etched between the lines of a brilliant quasi-journalistic investigation, that would haunt Capote throughout his writing life. For my illustration on the 1960s, see the link in my bio.

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2 weeks ago

1960s: Goldfinger is a 1964 British spy film and the third installment in the James Bond series produced by Eon Productions, starring Sean Connery as the fictional MI6 agent James Bond. It is based on the novel of the same name by Ian Fleming. The villain of the film is Auric Goldfinger, a gold-obsessed megalomaniac with a plan to take the world's precious metals market hostage. James Bond gets in the way, so Goldfinger puts him in the way of his newest destruction device: "You are looking at an industrial laser which emits an extraordinary light, not to be found in nature. It can project a spot on the moon — or at closer range, cut through solid metal. I will show you.” In reality, the first laser was built in only four years before this film by Theodore H. Maiman at Hughes Research Laboratories. Later on in the scene when Bond inquires whether Goldfinger expects him to talk, he receives the most villainous reply in cinema history: “No Mister Bond, I expect you to die”. For my illustration on the 1960s, see the link in my bio.

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2 weeks ago

1960s: A record 73 million Americans (roughly two-fifths of the population) watched as The Beatles took the stage for their Ed Sullivan Show debut. The Ed Sullivan Show would feature The Beatles two more times in the next two weeks. By the time of the band’s fourth and final in-person performance, the “British Invasion,” as it was called, was well underway. Following The Beatles’ lead, countless British rock bands — The Rolling Stones, The Who, The Kinks, and Cream, to name a few — would go on to achieve commercial success in the US. Some of these bands would look to black American musical genres, such as the blues and R&B, for inspiration; on the other side of the coin, American artists like The Byrds and Jimi Hendrix tried to emulate a British rock sound. (Hendrix’s career, it’s worth noting, didn’t take off until he moved to London.) The Beatles’ first Ed Sullivan Show performance didn’t just alter the band’s trajectory, but that of rock music as a whole. It built a bridge between the two realms of rock music, giving British artists a new audience and American artists new sonic influences. Without it, you still have Highway 61 Revisited, The Velvet Underground & Nico, and The Doors, but there is no Rubber Soul, Pet Sounds, or Are You Experienced — or any of the countless records that owe their existence to the syncretism of American and British music. Writ large, rock history is full of what-ifs and unhappy endings: plane crashes, substance abuse, breakups (between musical partners or romantic partners — and sometimes, both). For once, it’s nice to look back on a moment when everything went right. For my illustration on the 1960s, see the link in my bio.

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2 weeks ago

1960s: President John F. Kennedy was assassinated while riding in a motorcade in Dallas during a campaign visit. Kennedy’s motorcade was turning past the Texas School Book Depository at Dealey Plaza with crowds lining the streets—when shots rang out. The driver of the president’s Lincoln limousine, with its top off, raced to nearby Parkland Memorial Hospital, but after being shot in the neck and head, Kennedy was pronounced dead. He was 46 years old. A generation of Americans would forever remember where they were when they heard about the president’s assassination, as it would have a profound political and cultural impact on the nation. An hour later, Lee Harvey Oswald, a new employee at the Book Depository, was arrested for JFK’s assassination, as well as for the fatal shooting of Dallas patrolman J.D. Tippit. Two days later, Oswald would be murdered by local nightclub owner and police informant Jack Ruby at point-blank range and on live TV. The President's Commission on the Assassination of President Kennedy—known as the Warren Commission—concluded "the shots which killed President Kennedy and wounded Governor Connally were fired from the sixth-floor window at the southeast corner of the Texas School Book Depository." It also said, "The shots which killed President Kennedy and wounded Governor Connally were fired by Lee Harvey Oswald.” Despite the official finding, many believe Oswald didn't act alone, or that other conspirators—from the world of organized crime to the CIA to Cuban exiles—are responsible for Kennedy’s assassination. A 2017 poll by FiveThirtyEight, found just 33 percent of Americans believe Oswald alone killed Kennedy. For my illustration on the 1960s, see the link in my bio.

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2 weeks ago

1960s: American civil rights activist Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his most famous speech, "I Have a Dream" during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, in which he called for civil and economic rights and an end to racism in the United States. Delivered to over 250,000 civil rights supporters from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C., the speech was a defining moment of the civil rights movement. Here is an excerpt from that speech: I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: "We hold these truths to be self-evident; that all men are created equal." I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood. I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice. I have a dream that my four little will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. I have a dream today. For my illustration on the 1960s, see the link in my bio.

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3 weeks ago

An illustrated homage to the Swinging Sixties. Can you guess all the references? For my full illustration on the 1960s, see the link in my bio.

252
3 weeks ago

An illustrated homage to the Swinging Sixties. Can you guess all the references? For my full illustration on the 1960s, see the link in my bio.

241
3 weeks ago

An illustrated homage to the Swinging Sixties. Can you guess all the references? For my full illustration on the 1960s, see the link in my bio.

142
3 weeks ago

An illustrated homage to the Swinging Sixties. Can you guess all the references? For my full illustration on the 1960s, see the link in my bio.

302
3 weeks ago

An illustrated homage to the Swinging Sixties. Can you guess all the references? For my full illustration on the 1960s, see the link in my bio.

201
3 weeks ago

An illustrated homage to the Swinging Sixties. Can you guess all the references? For my full illustration on the 1960s, see the link in my bio.

192
3 weeks ago

An illustrated homage to the Swinging Sixties. Can you guess all the references? For my full illustration on the 1960s, see the link in my bio.

311
3 weeks ago

An illustrated homage to the Swinging Sixties. Can you guess all the references? For my full illustration on the 1960s, see the link in my bio.

192
3 weeks ago

An illustrated homage to the Swinging Sixties. Can you guess all the references? For my full illustration on the 1960s, see the link in my bio.

152
3 weeks ago

An illustrated homage to the Swinging Sixties. Can you guess all the references? For my full illustration on the 1960s, see the link in my bio.