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Arundhati Katju and Menaka Guruswamy, two public-interest litigators who won a landmark rights case in India, are among the 100 most influential people of 2019. "Arundhati and Menaka have helped take a giant step for LGBTQ+ rights in the world’s largest democracy," writes priyankachopra. "In their committed fight for justice, they have shown us that we as a society must continue to make progress, even after laws are changed, and that we must make an effort to understand, accept and love." Read more, and see the full TIME100 list, at the link in bio. Photograph by paridukovic for TIME

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jairmessiasbolsonaro, the president of Brazil, is one of the 100 most influential people of 2019. "Fascination with his appetite for controversy obscures an important truth about his country: Brazil remains a dynamic democracy with robust institutions that will limit both the good and the harm he might do," writes ianbremmer. Read more, and see the full TIME100 list, at the link in bio. Photograph by danielmarenco for TIME

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radhyaalmutawakel is one of the 100 most influential people of 2019. "Radhya and her colleagues face risks every day to uncover the human costs of war" in Yemen, writes berniesanders. "For leading this work, Radhya Almutawakel deserves recognition as one of the truly courageous among us." Read more, and see the full TIME100 list, at the link in bio. Photograph by heathersten for TIME

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iamreginaking is one of the 100 most influential people of 2019. "We’re on the battlegrounds together as women and women of color," writes violadavis. "We connect as people who see other artists and who really take it upon ourselves to elevate them." Read more, and see the full TIME100 list, at the link in bio. Photograph by marcogrob for TIME

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bts.bighitofficial is on TIME's list of the 100 most influential people of 2019. "Behind those three letters are seven astounding men who believe that music is stronger than the barriers of language," writes iamhalsey. "It’s a universal dialect." Read more, and see the full TIME100 list, at the link in bio. Photograph by nhuxuanhua for TIME

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Christine Blasey Ford is one of the 100 most influential people of 2019. “Through her courage," writes kamalaharris, "she forced the country to reckon with an issue that has too often been ignored and kept in the dark.” Read more, and see the full TIME100 list, at the link in bio. Photograph by daniellelevitt for TIME

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taylorswift is one of the 100 most influential people of 2019. "The magic of Taylor Swift doesn’t come from the lights, dancers or fireworks (although all of that is incredible)," writes shawnmendes, "but from the electrifying connection that she has with the people who are there to see her." See the full TIME100 list at the link in bio. Photograph by paridukovic for TIME

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Dwayne Johnson ( therock) is one of the 100 most influential people of 2019. "He is the true embodiment of the idea that people may forget what you said, people may forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel," writes gal_gadot. See the full TIME100 list at the link in bio, and swipe for a video interview with Johnson. Photograph by paridukovic for TIME. Video by fancybethany and spencerbakalar

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iamsandraohinsta is one of the 100 most influential people of 2019. "With her nuanced characters," writes shondarhimes, "Sandra Oh has chosen to fearlessly take up space in a universe that has not always made space for her." See the full TIME100 list at the link in bio, and swipe for a video interview with Oh. Photograph by paridukovic for TIME. Video by fancybethany, adamperez22 and juliamarielull

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gayleking is one of the 100 most influential people of 2019. "To be present, but not centered. To observe. To bear witness. Gayle has long honed this craft," writes ava. See the full TIME100 list at the link in bio, and swipe for a video interview with King. Photograph by paridukovic for TIME. Video by erisolano, juliamarielull and arpane

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Mohamed Salah ( mosalah) is one of the 100 most influential people of 2019. "Mo Salah is a better human being than he is a football player," writes John Oliver of lastweektonight. "And he’s one of the best football players in the world." See the full TIME100 list at the link in bio, and swipe for a video interview with Salah. Photograph by paridukovic for TIME. Video by rscafuro and aminmusaphoto

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How does one get into Lincoln impersonation? “It really wasn’t my idea in the first place. Something came up and they were looking for an AbrahamLincoln and they liked my long, thin face, and I said okay," said Robert Broski, who was photographed taking a selfie on April 13. “The event was a month away and they wanted me to grow a beard,” he added. “I said, ‘fine, let me grow it and we’ll see what the heck happens.’ So I grew the beard and I looked in the mirror and I said, ‘holy-moley!’ And I thought to myself, ‘If I don’t represent Lincoln, shame on me.’ I grew the beard in my fifties, just like Mr. Lincoln did. And I left it on. I haven’t shaved it off for 10 years." Broski, 66, of Covina, Calif., recently joined dozens of other faux-Lincolns for the 25th annual Association of Lincoln Presenters, a conference of reenactors, amateur historians and other Honest Abe enthusiasts held at the Amicalola State Falls Lodge in Dawsonville, Georgia. This year, the re-enactors toured the mine where the marble for the Lincoln Memorial was sourced. "I feel like this is my destiny," Broski said, "as weird as that sounds.” Read more, and see more pictures, at the link in bio. Photograph by benjaminnorman for TIME

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In the stunned aftermath of the Notre-Dame blaze, French firefighters and experts ventured into the devastated cathedral on April 16 to survey what remained. They finally declared that the structure of the 859-year-old cathedral had been saved, and that firefighters had rescued some of the most precious relics and stashed them in Paris’s City Hall, even while the world watched aghast at flames leaping from the Medieval icon. In the morning-after shock, those who have for years tracked the declining condition of the cathedral wondered whether the fire might have been far less severe had they launched major renovations years ago—an option that the cash-strapped NotreDame had been unable to do. Notre-Dame began a $170 million (€150-million) construction project last year, in an effort to restore and upgrade the wooden roof and spire, which was considered to be the most urgently needed work. “It was a question of starting too late,” says Michel Picaud, head of the non-profit organization Friends of Notre-Dame de Paris, which launched a fundraising effort across the U.S. in 2017 to pay for the work. “There was fire proofing everywhere, but it was not enough, after what we saw,” he told TIME. Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by Christophe Petit Tesson—EPA-EFE/Shutterstock

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People gathered across Paris in shock and in tears as the Notre Dame cathedral, one of the city’s most famous landmarks, caught on fire, sending up giant billows of smoke and flames. The fire broke out Monday evening local time, and the flames quickly engulfed the cathedral’s spire, which was reconstructed in the 19th century, causing it to collapse. Firefighters said they are optimistic they can save Notre Dame’s main structure and towers from the flames. French President Emmanuel Macron, in a speech to the nation Monday night, offered thanks to emergency responders who battled the flames. “We will rebuild Notre Dame together,” Macron vowed. “This is our history, and it’s burning.” Read more at the link in the bio. Video source Hash Miser

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A huge fire has broken out in Paris’ Notre Dame, the world-famous, 850-year-old cathedral on Monday, destroying the frame and toppling the structure’s storied spire. A Paris fire department spokesperson told Reuters that the area was being cleared and a large-scale operation was underway to address the blaze. The Associated Press is reporting that Paris police say the cause of the fire is unknown and no deaths have been reported. Read the full story at the link in the bio. Photographs by nicolasliponnenurphoto_agency/ gettyimages; Thomas Samson— afpphoto/ gettyimages; gvdh_photoafpphoto/ gettyimages; Ludovic Marin— afpphoto/ gettyimages

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The most thrilling comeback in American sports history had to be completed at Augusta, at the Masters on a Sunday afternoon in April, writes Sean Gregory. After all, the Augusta National Golf Club is where tigerwoods, 22 years ago, first burst into our cultural consciousness, like no one we had ever seen before: golf’s first black superstar, a player who everyone figured would rewrite his sport’s record book. By the time he was 32, Woods had won 14 major championships during his astonishing prime. Then came the personal scandal about a decade ago, which the fed tabloids for months and destroyed his marriage. He returned to golf, but kept getting hurt. Woods fell out of the top 1,000 in the world golf rankings. He thought he may never play again. On Memorial Day Weekend in 2017, police found him asleep at the wheel, and arrested him. He had painkillers in his system, and was struggling with managing that pain. Wearing a Green Jacket less than two years later was unimaginable. The 14-year gap between Tiger’s fourth and fifth Masters wins is the largest in golf history. When he tapped in the winning putt, for his 15th career major, Woods screamed and flipped his club. Augusta’s proper “patrons” turned into actual sports fans, celebrating as if their team just won a Super Bowl. “Tiger! Tiger! Tiger!” the fans chanted, pushing up the volume to college football stadium decibel levels. Read the full story at the link in bio. Photograph by Kevin C. Cox ( coxionary)— gettyimages

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Irish author Sally Rooney staked her claim as the first great novelist of the Millennial generation with her stunning 2017 debut, Conversations With Friends, which tells the story of a bisexual communist who expresses the emotions she can’t in person through emails and texts. Rooney, 28, mines similar territory in her latest love story, the equally engrossing but still more conventional Normal People. This book’s protagonists, Marianne and Connell, are in many ways opposites: she comes from a cold, wealthy family, he from one that’s cash-strapped but rich in love; she doesn’t care what others think of her, he does. But they share an anxiety about achieving “normalcy” that bonds them. Marianne also suffers from abuse at home, a fact she tentatively reveals to Connell. Rooney shines when she depicts how the waves of trauma consume both the victim and her romantic partners and offers a realistic portrayal of how two teenagers might struggle with the ramifications of one’s upbringing, writes edockterman. The fallout of abuse remains a subject well worth exploring, and here, Rooney takes an admirable first step. Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by cristofariphotocontrasto_photographers/ reduxpictures

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Homes make a city. More than buildings, roads, schools, markets, hospitals and shops, it’s homes and the people who live in them that create the life of a place. ISIS conquered Raqqa, which it named its first capital, and eventually the Iraqi city of Mosul, where it declared its caliphate, in order to control millions of those lives. The militants ruled with a level of cruelty and madness almost unknown in our time, and it took a year of sustained combat to pry the two cities from their grasp. The destruction is near total. The United Nations calculates that 80 percent of the Old City of Mosul is in ruins, with 8,000 homes damaged or destroyed. The detritus of daily life mixed with the castoffs of war, writes photographer victorblue. Residents have slowly, fitfully returned to try and carve a new path out of the wreckage. In these photographs: Mahmoud Said Dawood, 55, has rebuilt about 40% of his home in Mosul with a loan from family members. Saja Ahmed, 9, also lost her home in the battle against ISIS. Read more, and see more pictures, at the link in bio. Photographs by victorblue

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For 25 years, Abraham Lincoln lookalikes have met for the annual Association of Lincoln Presenters Conference. This year, the group travelled to Blue Ridge to take the scenic historic train ride to McCaysville, Ga. for lunch and shopping. Whit McMahon, right, who has spent 16 years as a Lincoln presenter, is now 56 years old, the same age as Lincoln when he was assassinated. "I'm here to help preserve the memory of Abraham Lincoln," he said. “As a , whenever our family visited central Kentucky, I would request to visit Abraham Lincoln’s birthplace. This happened on 4-5 different occasions. I believe these were divinely inspired visits and that God had a hand in preparing me for my ultimate role as a Lincoln presenter.” Here, a group of Lincolns hang out in front of the train before departing. Photograph by benjaminnorman for TIME

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Ex–White House chief strategist Steve Bannon on a rented private plane leaving Brussels to take him to London, where he would meet Nigel Farage, Vice Chairman of the pro-Brexit Leave Means Leave campaign. For years, proponents of the E.U. could rely on the fact that their opposition was hardly united. Europe’s far-right and nationalist parties tend to share little beyond concerns about illegal immigration and Islamist-inspired terrorism. But now Europe’s disrupters are trying to coax those big personalities to keep their eyes on a bigger prize: remaking the E.U. That was Bannon’s message when he opted to throw himself into the European campaign after leaving the White House. Inspired by Trump’s 2016 campaign, Italy’s Salvini–who has met with Bannon twice –has catapulted his anti-immigrant League party to the top of Italy’s polls with the slogan “Italy first!” In July, Bannon flew to London to meet right-wing Belgian politician Mischael Modrikamen. Over lunch, the two agreed to form an organization called the Movement, to bring together nationalist leaders across Europe ahead of the May 2019 elections. Bannon then darted around Europe, visiting right-wing leaders, as he attempted to knit together a coherent group. The idea, he told TIME, was to ready nationalist parties to win in the E.U. elections, through methods like data analytics and polling, honed during Trump’s campaign. “Europe is on fire right now with the populist movement,” he said last summer. “The centrist parties do not have the energy,” he said. “They do not have the youth, they do not have the ideas, they do not have the vigor.” Without a drastic fix, nationalism will increase its hold on the continent. “The status quo is not an option,” says France’s Economy Minister Bruno Le Maire. “The status quo will lead to the end of Europe.” Read more at link in bio. Photograph by cedricgerbehayemaps.images for TIME

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When the Taliban seized power in 1996, it waged a war against Afghan women. Girls’ education was banned. Women were confined to the home and denied the right to work. These are living memories for millions of Afghans, and they have become present concerns as U.S. government representatives negotiate with the Taliban about a settlement that could see it return to a position of power and influence in Afghanistan. Today, nearly a third of the Afghan parliament and civil service are women. Afghan women are professors, artists, journalists, lawyers and judges; they serve in the national police force and military. The nation’s ambassador to the U.S. is a woman. This progress is inspiring yet fragile: women and girls there still routinely face discrimination and violence. Women, who have the most to lose if the Taliban returns to power, currently have the least say in the process by which it may do so, writes Angelina Jolie, actor and co-founder of the Preventing Sexual Violence in Conflict Initiative. While no one doubts the need for peace, Afghan women want to know that they won’t be betrayed, and their rights won’t be undermined by these negotiations. In this photo, women walk in the old section of Herat, Afghanistan on Jan.9, 2018. Photograph by Hoshang Hashimi— afpphoto/ gettyimages

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In Flint, residents still won't trust their taps. Five years ago this month, the city began using the corrosive Flint River as its main source of water, which ate away the city's pipes and leached lead into the drinking water of thousands of residents. Eighteen months later, the city reconnected to Detroit’s clean water supply after studies confirmed what parents had been telling officials: that lead from their taps was poisoning their families. Thousands of lead-tainted pipes have been replaced. More than a dozen officials connected to one of the worst health disasters in U.S. history are facing criminal charges. But for many residents, the crisis continues. Flint's families still stand in line for cases of bottled water. Parents are still fearful of lurking health problems. "Our are still sick and at risk," says Ariana Hawk. In this photo, Hawk, mother of Sincere, 6, starts warming bottled water to prepare a bath for her two younger in April 2018. Sincere's fear of water never left him. "He talks about how it's poison," she says. "He doesn't trust water." Read more, and see more pictures, at the link in bio. Photograph by brittanygreeson for TIME

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One of the world’s most extraordinary experiments in governance—a union throwing together 28 countries with wildly different cultures, to fight around a negotiating table rather than on the battlefield—is under siege, writes Vivienne Walt. The European Parliament elections in May could finally allow populists and nationalists to remake the E.U. from within. Europeans sense they can no longer take their union for granted, as politicians once sidelined as fringe extremists have moved into the mainstream, even if many are still in the opposition. “We are writing history with a big H,” French politician Marine Le Pen says, sitting in her office recently in the Parliament in Paris. There is no exit talk from nationalist politicians like Hungary’s Prime Minister Viktor Orban or Italy’s Deputy Prime Minister Matteo Salvini. What has replaced a desire to leave, however, could be just as hazardous for Europe: a plan to pick apart the fabric of the E.U., from Brussels itself. “They do not like anything to do with Europe, and they will do anything to destroy it,” says Fabrice Pothier, a former NATO policy-planning director. A chilling question looms for Europe’s leaders: whether the E.U. can survive in the long term at all. Read more at the link in bio. Illustration by Craig Ward ( mrcraigward) for TIME; animation by brobeldesign

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On April 9, the Pentagon announced two military contracts worth $976 million to construct a wall along the U.S. border with Mexico, marking the first step toward President Trump’s long-promised goal since he declared a national emergency nearly two months ago. To pay for these new barriers, the Pentagon is diverting up to $1 billion to support the Department of Homeland Security to block “drug-smuggling corridors” in those areas. The Defense Department, triggered by Trump’s emergency declaration to build a border wall, took the unprecedented tactic of notifying Congress about the transfer of funding, rather than requesting the money through the appropriations process. The move drew fire from Democrats and Republicans who saw it as a way for the administration to sidestep Congress’ constitutional power over government spending. In this photograph two days earlier, a stretch of border fence is illuminated by a U.S. Border Patrol light near Penitas, Texas. Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by lorenelliottphotoreuters

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Central American asylum-seekers turn themselves in to U.S. Border Patrol officers after illegally crossing the Rio Grande near Penitas, Texas, on April 6. On Monday, an American judge blocked the Trump administration’s policy of returning asylum-seekers to Mexico as they wait for an immigration court to hear their cases, apnews reports. The ruling, which is on hold for several days, came one day after Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen resigned and as President Trump and his administration face repeated court setbacks on strict anti-immigration measures. Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by lorenelliottphotoreuters

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Flowers laid by relatives of 10 Belgian unitednations peacekeepers, who were killed while protecting the Rwandan prime minister in 1994, are seen against a pockmarked wall in the room where the slayings occurred in Kigali on April 8. Rwanda is marking 25 years since the start of its genocide, which left some 800,000 people dead. “Our bodies and minds bear amputations and scars, but none of us is alone,” President Paul Kagame said at a commemoration ceremony, apnews reports. “We Rwandans have granted ourselves a new beginning. We exist in a state of permanent commemoration, every day, in all that we do … Today, light radiates from this place.” Photograph by Yasuyoshi Chiba— afpphoto/ gettyimages

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Members of the Baylor Lady Bears ( baylorwbb) celebrate their team's 82-81 win over the Notre Dame Fighting Irish ( ndwbb) in the NCAA women's basketball championship at Amalie Arena in Tampa, Fla., on April 7. Sunday's victory marks the Lady Bears' first championship in seven years. “We just beat the defending national champions," Baylor head coach Kim Mulkey said, apnews reports. 'That team is so good, so talented. You’re going to see those guys play at the next level. Wow." Photograph by mikeehrmanngettyimages 🏀

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Homes make a city. More than buildings, roads, schools, markets, hospitals and shops, it’s homes and the people who live in them that create the life of a place. ISIS conquered Raqqa, which it named its first capital, and eventually the Iraqi city of Mosul, where it declared its caliphate, in order to control millions of those lives. The militants ruled with a level of cruelty and madness almost unknown in our time, and it took a year of sustained combat to pry the two cities from their grasp. The United Nations calculates that 80% of the Old City of Mosul is in ruins. Raqqa is considered “unfit for human habitation,” with 11,000 buildings damaged or destroyed. The consequences for residents are worse. Walking slowly along the mounds reveals an archaeology of oblivion, writes photographer victorblue. The detritus of daily life mixed with the castoffs of war—ammunition and unexploded ordnance, toys, cooking pots, kevlar vests and flowered blankets—all tossed with human remains. It taxes the imagination to visualize the amount of explosive power needed to destroy so many buildings. Read more, and see more pictures, at the link in bio. Photograph by victorblue

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Vermont Senator berniesanders is seen in a reflection at the National Action Network’s annual conference in NewYork on April 5. Sanders was among a handful of Democratic presidential candidates who spoke about racial equality issues at the gathering for the civil rights group, founded by the Rev. Al Sharpton ( real_sharpton), including the study of reparations and criminal justice reform. Photograph by theotherchrislee for TIME